Alerta del tiempo

Estudio de la Universidad de Utah

How can I share my opinions about this study? 

Before the study starts, meetings will be held in the community to provide information, answer questions, and get community members’ thoughts and feelings about the study. You can call the study team to complete a one-on-one interview or survey about the study. There will also be information about the study in the media (for example, newspapers, TV and radio). 

What if I do not want to be included in the study? If you decide you don’t want to be included in the event you suffer a future TBI, contact us to request an Opt Out medical alert bracelet be sent to you to wear with the words “BOOST3 declined”. Wearing this medical alert bracelet at all times throughout the study period (about 5 years), is your way of communicating your wishes in case you suffer a severe TBI and are unconscious. If you do not participate in the study, you will receive the standard medical treatment provided for traumatic brain injuries at the hospital in your community. 

Where can I learn more about this study? Online at: boost3trial.org Or if you would like to know about a community meeting near you or to get more information about BOOST3, contact a local study team member (on the back). 

SIREN Network 

The BOOST3 study is part of The Strategies to Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN). SIREN is funded by the National Institutes of Health, an agency of the federal government. 

SIREN seeks to improve the outcomes of patients with neurologic, cardiac, respiratory, hematologic and trauma emergencies by identifying effective treatments administered in the earliest stages of critical care. 

The SIREN Network funds 13 institutions across the country to coordinate and enroll subjects at many additional hospitals. About 45 hospitals will participate in BOOST3. The hospitals participating in BOOST3 in this area include: 

  • The University of Utah 

Contact Us 

BOOST3 Study University of Utah 30N 1900E 1C026 Salt Lake City, Utah 84132 

https://is.gd/uofutahBOOST3 

Phone: 801.587.7831 E-mail: [email protected] 

Learn about a study of emergency care in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. 

Learn about a study of emergency care in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. 

Learn about a study of emergency care in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. 

Learn about a study of emergency care in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. 

Learn about a study of emergency care in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. 

This study that may affect you or someone you know. 

This study that may affect you or someone you know. 

This study that may affect you or someone you know. 

A research study conducted by The Strategies to Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN) 

A research study conducted by The Strategies to Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN) 

A research study conducted by The Strategies to Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN) 

boost3trial.org 

boost3trial.org 

What is TBI? 

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is sudden damage to the brain caused by an outside force to the head – such as a car crash, a fall, or something hitting the head. 

  • Every 15 seconds someone in the US suffers a major TBI. 
  • Every five minutes someone is forever disabled as a result of TBI. 
  • TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in children and adults 1-44 years of age. TBI can affect a person’s ability to think and remember things, cause problems with balance and coordination, prevent a person from functioning independently, cause permanent brain damage or even death. 

What is BOOST3? BOOST3 is a research study to learn if either of two strategies for monitoring and treating patients with TBI in the intensive care unit (ICU) is more likely to help them get better. Both of these alternative strategies are used in standard care. It is unknown if one is more effective than the other. In one strategy doctors concentrate only on preventing high ICP (intracranial pressure) caused by a swollen brain. In the other strategy doctors try to prevent high ICP, and also try to prevent low PbtO2 (brain oxygen). It is unknown if measuring and treating low brain oxygen is more effective, less effective, or the same as monitoring and treating high brain pressure alone. The results of this study will help doctors discover if one of these methods is more safe and effective. 

Who will be included? 

  • People who are 14 years or older with a 
  • Blunt closed head injury, with 
  • Severe brain injury, and 
  • Can start the study immediately following brain monitor placement. People who meet the entry criteria will be randomly entered, like flipping a coin, into one of the two study groups: 
  • Those that get medical care based on monitoring of pressure in the brain (intracranial pressure or ICP) alone. 
  • Those who get medical care based on both ICP and the amount of oxygen in the brain (brain tissue oxygen or PbtO2). 

What are the benefits? Because we do not know which treatment is best for treating TBI, a person enrolled in the study may benefit from being placed in one study group over the other. Based on the information we get from this study, people who have a TBI in the future may benefit from what is learned from this study. 

What are the risks? 

The different treatment strategies may affect: 

  • Risk of pneumonia or lung injury 
  • Severe infection in the blood or brain 

Brain probes may involve risks of 

  • Bleeding or infection 

Risks of participating in research include: 

  • Breaches of confidentiality 

How is enrollment in BOOST3 different from other studies? 

How is enrollment in BOOST3 different from other studies? 

How is enrollment in BOOST3 different from other studies? 

How is enrollment in BOOST3 different from other studies? 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

Normally, researchers get permission (consent) before a person can be included in a study. A person with a severe TBI will not be able to give consent at the time of injury. Since TBI must be treated quickly, there might not be enough time to locate and talk to the person’s family or legal representative about the study. The strategies being studied typically need to start within 2 to 10 hours of injury. When consent is not possible, a person might be enrolled in this study without consent. This is called “Exception from Informed Consent” (EFIC). Once the family or legal representative is located, they will be asked whether they want the participant to continue in the study. 

What is EFIC? 

Exception from informed consent (EFIC) for emergency research refers to a special set of rules used by the US government to regulate studies when research participants cannot tell researchers their desires in a medical emergency. These special rules allow research studies in certain emergency situations to be conducted without consent. EFIC can only be used when: 

Exception from informed consent (EFIC) for emergency research refers to a special set of rules used by the US government to regulate studies when research participants cannot tell researchers their desires in a medical emergency. These special rules allow research studies in certain emergency situations to be conducted without consent. EFIC can only be used when: 

Exception from informed consent (EFIC) for emergency research refers to a special set of rules used by the US government to regulate studies when research participants cannot tell researchers their desires in a medical emergency. These special rules allow research studies in certain emergency situations to be conducted without consent. EFIC can only be used when: 

Exception from informed consent (EFIC) for emergency research refers to a special set of rules used by the US government to regulate studies when research participants cannot tell researchers their desires in a medical emergency. These special rules allow research studies in certain emergency situations to be conducted without consent. EFIC can only be used when: 

  • The person’s life is at risk, AND, 
  • The best treatment is not known, AND 
  • The study might help the person, AND 
  • It is not possible to get permission: o from the person because of his or her medical condition nor o from the person’s representative because there is a very short amount of time required to treat the medical problem, or the representative is not available.

 

A study of emergency care involving victims of severe brain trauma is to be performed in this area.

The University of Utah is conducting a research study to learn if either of two strategies for monitoring and treating patients with severe traumatic brain injury in the intensive care unit (ICU) is more likely to help them get better.  Both of these alternative strategies are used in standard care.  It is unknown if one is more effective than the other.

In one strategy doctors concentrate on preventing high intracranial pressure caused by a swollen brain.  In the other strategy doctors try to prevent high intracranial pressure and also try to prevent low brain oxygen levels.  This study will discover if either strategy is more safe and effective. 

Because head injury is a life threatening condition requiring immediate treatment, some patients will be enrolled without consent if a family member or representative cannot be rapidly available. Before the study starts, we will consult with the community. We welcome your feedback and questions.  We would appreciate feedback from you : https://is.gd/uofutahBOOST3 

For more information or to decline participation in this study, please visit boost3trial.org or contact our study staff at (801)587-7831

Primary Investigator: Dr. Holly Ledyard, MD 

Study Coordinator: Margaret Carlson

 

A study of emergency care involving victims of severe brain trauma is to be performed in this area. 

Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of death and disability in children and adults up to 44 years of age. Every 15 seconds someone in the US suffers a major traumatic brain injury, and every five minutes someone is forever disabled from traumatic brain injury.

 The University of Utah is conducting a research study to learn if either of two strategies for monitoring and treating patients with severe traumatic brain injury in the intensive care unit (ICU) is more likely to help them get better.  Both of these alternative strategies are used in standard care.  It is unknown if one is more effective than the other.

In one strategy doctors concentrate on preventing high intracranial pressure caused by a swollen brain.  In the other strategy doctors try to prevent high intracranial pressure and also try to prevent low brain oxygen levels.  This study will discover if either strategy is more safe and effective. 

The study will include adults and children older than 14 years with severe brain injury requiring admission to the ICU with brain monitoring. Hospitals across the country are conducting the study which is funded by the US National Institutes of Health.  

Because head injury is a life threatening condition requiring immediate treatment, some patients will be enrolled without consent if a family member or other representative is not rapidly available. Every attempt will be made to locate family prior to enrollment to allow them to decide about the patient’s participation in the study.  

Before the study starts, we will consult with the community. We welcome your feedback and questions: https://is.gd/uofutahBOOST3 

For more information or to decline participation in this study, please visit boost3trial.org or contact our study staff at (801)587-7831.

Primary Investigator: Dr. Holly Ledyard, MD 

Study Coordinator: Margaret Carlson

Se llevará a cabo en esta área un estudio de atención de emergencia para víctimas de traumatismo  cerebral grave. 

<CIUSSS-NIM Hopital du Sacre – Coeur de Montreal> llevará a cabo un estudio de investigación que busca saber si alguna de las dos estrategias para controlar y tratar a los pacientes con traumatismo craneoencefálico en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (ICU, por sus siglas en inglés) tiene más probabilidades de ayudarlos a recuperarse. Dado que las lesiones en la cabeza son potencialmente mortales y requieren tratamiento inmediato, algunos pacientes serán inscritos en el estudio sin que se obtenga el consentimiento previo si un familiar o un representante no están disponibles de inmediato. Antes de que el estudio comience, consultaremos a los miembros de la comunidad. Nos gustaría recibir sus comentarios y preguntas. Para obtener más información o para rechazar la participación en este estudio, visite el sitio web boost3trial.org o comuníquese con el personal del estudio llamando al: 

(xxx) xxx-xxxx.

Investigador principal: Dr       .      <name>, MD 

Coordinador del estudio: <name> 

Copia de anuncio impreso en periódico, anuncio de 10 pulgadas en columnas (5” x 2 columnas), en color. 

Se llevará a cabo en esta área un estudio de atención de emergencia para víctimas de traumatismo  cerebral grave. 

< CIUSSS-NIM Hopital du Sacre – Coeur de Montreal > llevará a cabo un estudio de investigación que busca saber si alguna de las dos estrategias para controlar y tratar a los pacientes con traumatismo craneoencefálico en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (ICU, por sus siglas en inglés) tiene más probabilidades de ayudarlos a recuperarse. Dado que las lesiones en la cabeza son potencialmente mortales y requieren tratamiento inmediato, algunos pacientes serán inscritos en el estudio sin que se obtenga el consentimiento previo si un familiar o un representante no están disponibles de inmediato. Antes de que el estudio comience, consultaremos a los miembros de la comunidad. Nos gustaría recibir sus comentarios y preguntas. Para obtener más información o para rechazar la participación en este estudio, visite el sitio web boost3trial.org o comuníquese con el personal del estudio llamando al: 

(xxx) xxx-xxxx.

Investigador principal: Dr       .      <name>, MD 

Coordinador del estudio: <name> 

 

Se llevará a cabo en esta área un estudio de atención de emergencia para víctimas de traumatismo cerebral grave. 

CIUSSS-NIM Hopital du Sacre – Coeur de Montreal llevará a cabo un estudio de investigación que busca saber si alguna de las dos estrategias para controlar y tratar a los pacientes con traumatismo craneoencefálico en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (ICU, por sus siglas en inglés) tiene más probabilidades de ayudarlos a recuperarse. Estas dos estrategias alternativas son parte de la atención estándar. Se desconoce si una es más eficaz que la otra. Dado que las lesiones en la cabeza son potencialmente mortales y requieren tratamiento inmediato, algunos pacientes serán inscritos en el estudio sin que se obtenga el consentimiento previo si un familiar o un representante no están disponibles de inmediato. Antes de que el estudio comience, consultaremos a los miembros de la comunidad. Nos gustaría recibir sus comentarios y preguntas. Para obtener más información o para rechazar la participación en este estudio, visite el sitio web boost3trial.org o comuníquese con el personal del estudio llamando al (xxx) xx     x-xxxx. 

Investigador principal: Dr.                                    <first last name>, MD  Coordinador del estudio:                           <First last name> 

 

 

Se llevará a cabo en esta área un estudio de atención de emergencia para víctimas de traumatismo cerebral grave. 

Universidad de Utah llevará a cabo un estudio de investigación que busca saber si alguna de las dos estrategias para controlar y tratar a los pacientes con traumatismo craneoencefálico en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (ICU, por sus siglas en inglés) tiene más probabilidades de ayudarlos a recuperarse. Estas dos estrategias alternativas son parte de la atención estándar. Se desconoce si una es más eficaz que la otra. Dado que las lesiones en la cabeza son potencialmente mortales y requieren tratamiento inmediato, algunos pacientes serán inscritos en el estudio sin que se obtenga el consentimiento previo si un familiar o un representante no están disponibles de inmediato. Antes de que el estudio comience, consultaremos a los miembros de la comunidad. Nos gustaría recibir sus comentarios y preguntas. 

Antes de comenzar el estudio, consultaremos con la comunidad. Agradecemos sus comentarios y preguntas:    https://is.gd/uofutahBOOST3

Para obtener más información o para rechazar la participación en este estudio, visite el sitio web boost3trial.org o comuníquese con el personal del estudio llamando al (801)587.7831. 

Investigador principal: Dr. Holly Ledyard,MD

Coordinador del estudio: Margaret Carlson

¿Cómo puedo compartir mis opiniones sobre este estudio? 

Antes de que comience el estudio, se llevarán a cabo reuniones en la comunidad para proporcionar información, responder preguntas y obtener las opiniones y sensaciones de los miembros de la comunidad con respecto al estudio. Usted puede comunicarse con el equipo del estudio para completar una encuesta o entrevista individual sobre este. También habrá información sobre el estudio en los medios de comunicación (por ejemplo, en los periódicos, la televisión y la radio). 

 

¿Qué sucede si no deseo participar en el estudio?  

Si decide que no desea participar en el estudio en caso de que sufra un traumatismo craneoencefálico (TBI, por sus siglas en inglés) en el futuro, comuníquese con nosotros para solicitar que le enviemos una pulsera de alerta médica de exclusión voluntaria, con la inscripción “BOOST3 declined” [BOOST3 rechazado], parar que la use. Usar esta pulsera de alerta médica en todo momento durante el período del estudio (alrededor de 5 años) es la manera de comunicar sus deseos en caso de que sufra un TBI grave y pierda la conciencia. Si no participa en el estudio, recibirá el tratamiento médico estándar para traumatismos craneoencefálicos en el hospital de su comunidad. 

 

¿Dónde puedo obtener más información sobre este estudio? 

En línea, en el sitio web boost3trial.org. Si desea saber acerca de alguna reunión en la comunidad cerca de usted u obtener más información sobre el estudio BOOST3, comuníquese con un miembro del equipo local del estudio (en el reverso). 

 

Red SIREN 

El estudio BOOST3 es parte de la Strategies to Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (Red de Estrategias para la Innovación en Ensayos Clínicos de Atención de Emergencia o SIREN, por sus siglas en inglés). SIREN está financiada por los National Institutes of Health (Institutos Nacionales de Salud), un organismo del gobierno federal. 

 

SIREN busca mejorar los resultados de los pacientes con emergencias neurológicas, cardíacas, respiratorias, hematológicas y traumáticas mediante la identificación y administración de tratamientos eficaces en las primeras etapas de la atención crítica. 

 

La Red SIREN financia a 13 instituciones en todo el país para coordinar e inscribir a pacientes en muchos otros hospitales. Cerca de 45 hospitales participarán en el BOOST3. Los hospitales que participarán en el BOOST3 en esta área son los siguientes: 

Contáctenos

Estudio BOOST3

Universidad de Utah

30N 1900E 1C026

Salt Lake City, Utah 84132

 

https://is.gd/uofutahBOOST3

 

Teléfono: 801.587.7831 

electrónico:[email protected].utah.edu

 

 

 

Obtenga información sobre un estudio de atención de 

emergencia para pacientes con traumatismo 

craneoencefálico 

grave. 

 

Este estudio puede implicarlos a usted o a alguna persona 

que usted conozca. 

 

 

 

 

Es un estudio de investigación  llevado a cabo por 

la Strategies to Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN).    

boost3trial.org

 

¿Qué es el TBI? 

El traumatismo craneoencefálico (TBI, por sus siglas en inglés) es un daño repentino en la cabeza causado por una fuerza externa, como un accidente automovilístico, una caída o un objeto que golpea la cabeza. 

  • Cada 15 segundos una persona en EE. UU. sufre un TBI grave.  
  • Cada cinco minutos una persona sufre una discapacidad permanente como consecuencia de un TBI. 
  • El TBI es la principal causa de muerte y discapacidad en niños y adultos de entre  1 y 44 años de edad.  

Un TBI puede afectar la capacidad de una persona para pensar y recordar cosas, causar problemas en el equilibro y la coordinación, evitar que una persona se desenvuelva de forma independiente o provocar un daño cerebral permanente e, incluso, la muerte. 

¿Qué es BOOST3? 

BOOST3 es un estudio de investigación que busca saber si alguna de las dos estrategias para controlar y tratar a los pacientes con TBI en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (ICU, por sus siglas en inglés) tiene más probabilidades de ayudarlos a recuperarse. Estas dos estrategias alternativas son parte de la atención estándar. Se desconoce si una es más eficaz que la otra. En una estrategia, los médicos se concentran solo en evitar la alta presión intracraneal (ICP, por sus siglas en inglés) causada por la inflamación del cerebro. En la otra, los médicos intentan evitar la ICP alta y también la baja presión de oxígeno en el tejido cerebral (PbtO2, por sus siglas en inglés). Se desconoce si medir y tratar el bajo nivel de oxigenación cerebral es más eficaz, menos eficaz o igual de eficaz que controlar y tratar solo la presión intracraneal alta. Los resultados de este estudio ayudarán a los médicos a descubrir si uno de estos métodos es más seguro y eficaz. 

¿Quiénes estarán incluidos? 

Personas de 14 años o más:  

  • con una lesión contundente cerrada en  

la cabeza; 

  • con un traumatismo craneoencefálico grave;  
  • y que puedan empezar el estudio de inmediato 

después de la colocación del sensor cerebral.  

Las personas que cumplan con los criterios de ingreso serán asignadas de forma aleatoria (como lanzar una moneda al aire) a uno de los dos grupos del estudio: 

  • El de las personas que reciben atención 

médica basada solo en el control de la presión en el cerebro (presión intracraneal o ICP).  

  • El de las personas que reciben atención médica basada tanto en controlar la ICP como la cantidad de oxígeno en el cerebro (presión de oxígeno en el tejido cerebral o PbtO2). 

¿Cuáles son los beneficios de participar? 

Dado que se desconoce qué tratamiento es mejor para el TBI, una persona inscrita en el estudio puede beneficiarse de ser asignada a uno de los grupos del estudio y no al otro. De acuerdo con la información que obtengamos a partir de este estudio, las personas que sufran un TBI en el futuro podrían beneficiarse de los resultados obtenidos.

¿Cuáles son los riesgos?  

Las diferentes estrategias de tratamiento  pueden causar lo siguiente: 

  • Neumonía o lesión pulmonar 
  • Infección grave en la sangre o en  el cerebro  

Los sensores cerebrales pueden causar  lo siguiente:  Sangrado o infección  

La participación en el estudio puede implicar lo siguiente: Violación de la confidencialidad  

¿En qué se diferencia la inscripción en el BOOST3 de la inscripción en otros estudios? Normalmente, los investigadores obtienen un permiso (consentimiento) para poder incluir a una persona en un estudio. Una persona con TBI grave no podrá dar su consentimiento en el momento en que ocurra la lesión. Dado que un TBI se debe tratar con rapidez, es posible que no haya tiempo suficiente para localizar y hablar sobre el estudio con un familiar o el representante legal de la persona. En general, las estrategias en estudio deben iniciarse entre 2 y 10 horas después de la lesión. Cuando no sea posible obtener el consentimiento, se podría inscribir a una persona en el estudio sin dicho consentimiento. Esto se denomina “Excepción al consentimiento informado” (EFIC, por sus siglas en inglés). Una vez localizado el familiar o el representante legal, se le preguntará si desea que el participante continúe en el estudio.
¿Qué es una EFIC? La Excepción al consentimiento informado (EFIC) para investigaciones de emergencia se refiere a un conjunto de reglas especiales utilizadas por el gobierno de EE. UU. para regular los estudios cuando los participantes de una investigación no pueden expresarles a los investigadores sus deseos durante una emergencia médica. Estas reglas especiales permiten que se lleven a cabo estudios de investigación en ciertas situaciones de emergencia sin un consentimiento previo. 
La EFIC solo se puede utilizar cuando se cumplen todas las siguientes condiciones: * La vida de la persona está en riesgo. *Se desconoce cuál es el mejor tratamiento.* Es posible que el estudio ayude a la persona. *No es posible obtener el consentimiento: de la persona debido a su afección médica, o ni del representante porque hay muy poco tiempo para tratar el problema médico o el representante no está disponible. 



Connect With Us Listen To Us On